Re-writing Stars Shed New Lighting on Strange Signal Coming From Galactic Center

Researchers have found an alternative description for a mysterious gamma-ray signal coming from the center of the galaxy, which was long claimed being a signature of dark matter.

Experts from The Australian National University or college (ANU) have found an alternative description for a mysterious gamma-ray signal coming from the centre of the universe, which was long claimed being a signature of dark issue.

Gamma-rays are the form of electromagnetic the radiation with the shortest wavelength and highest energy.

Co-author of the study Connect Professor Roland Crocker mentioned this particular gamma-ray signal — known as the Galactic Centre Extra — may actually come from a specific type of rapidly-rotating neutron star, the super-dense stellar remnants of some stars a lot more massive than our sun.

The Galactic Centre Excess is an unpredicted concentration of gamma-rays emerging from the centre of our galaxy that has long puzzled astronomers.

“ The work does not throw any doubt on the existence of the signal, but offers another potential source, ” Relate Professor Crocker said.

“ It is depending on millisecond pulsars — ungeladenes nukleon stars that spin actually quickly — around one hundred times a second.

“ Scientists have previously detected gamma-ray emissions from individual millisecond pulsars within the neighbourhood of the solar program, so we know these objects emit gamma-rays. Our model demonstrates that the integrated emission from a whole population of such stars, around hundred, 000 in number, would produce a signal entirely compatible with the Galactic Centre Excess. ”

The particular discovery may mean researchers have to re-think where these people look for clues about dark matter.

“ The nature of dark matter is entirely unknown, so any potential clues produce a lot of excitement, ” Relate Professor Crocker said.

“ But our results point to another important way to obtain gamma-ray production.

“ For instance, the gamma-ray signal from Andromeda, the following closest large galaxy to our own may be mostly because of millisecond pulsars. ”

ANU Masters college student Anuj Gautam led the research, which also involved scientists from The Australian Defence Power Academy, University of Canterbury, and University of Tokyo.


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